New group pushes for track-and-trace standards for medical marijuana

New group pushes for testing, track-and-trace standards for medical marijuana

Activists say current system puts patients at risk

A group of activists is pushing for stricter regulation in Maine’s medical marijuana market. Adult-use cannabis products, which can be purchased and used by anyone 21 and older in Maine, are subject to state track-and-trace requirements. The regulations require detailed electronic documentation of the cultivation, production, testing and transportation of cannabis products. However, medical cannabis products, which are prescribed to patients by doctors, are not subject to the same regulations. The group, which calls itself Close the Medical Marijuana Loophole, argues that the lack of a track-and-trace program for medical cannabis puts patients at risk. Scott Gagnon, a former member of the Maine Marijuana Advisory Committee, argues that the lack of a robust tracing system presents “a threat and a risk to patients but also generally to public health and public safety.” The group is calling on the Maine legislature to pass a law requiring medical cannabis products to be subject to the same testing and track-and-trace standards as products for adult use. Maine’s Office of Marijuana Policy, which oversees both the medical and adult use markets in the state, did not immediately respond to WMTW’s request for comment.

A group of activists is pushing for stricter regulation in Maine’s medical marijuana market.

Adult-use cannabis products, which can be purchased and used by anyone 21 and older in Maine, are subject to state track-and-trace requirements. The regulations require detailed electronic documentation of the cultivation, production, testing and transportation of cannabis products.

However, medical cannabis products, which are prescribed to patients by doctors, are not subject to the same regulations.

The group, which calls itself Close the Medical Marijuana Loophole, argues that the lack of a track-and-trace program for medical cannabis puts patients at risk.

Scott Gagnon, a former member of the Maine Marijuana Advisory Committee, argues that the lack of a robust tracing system presents “a threat and a risk to patients but also generally to public health and public safety.”

The group is calling on the Maine legislature to pass a law requiring medical cannabis products to be subject to the same testing and track-and-trace standards as products for adult use.

Maine’s Office of Marijuana Policy, which oversees both the medical and adult use markets in the state, did not immediately respond to WMTW’s request for comment.

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